Will an 18-year-old pop star convince young people that the COVID-19 vaccine is good 4 u?

Young Americans are trying to return to the normalcy they’ve long yearned for since the pandemic started. And, well? Things are shaping up to be a little brutal out here. Americans between 12 and 29 are contracting COVID-19 at the highest rates while being the least protected — only 38 percent are vaccinated against the virus as of May 22, according to the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention. The vaccine is now available in every state for people 12 and older, but Gen Z and younger m

Why can’t Olympians smoke weed?

Sha’Carri Richardson, once poised for Olympic gold, will not be running in Tokyo this summer. The news has drawn a sense from supporters that this young, Black track phenom has been wronged by sporting rules on pot that are overdue for a change. USA Track and Field announced that she had not been selected for the U.S. relay team on Tuesday, after she was disqualified earlier from the 100-meter race due to a positive test for THC. Her chances dashed at an Olympic debut, fellow elite athletes hav

7 takeaways from NewsHour’s investigation into harassment Black women in politics face

Black women in politics face a harrowing reality: Harassment, abuse and death threats for doing their jobs as Black women. To better understand their experiences, the PBS NewsHour requested interviews with more than 61 Black women who have held office or run for office at various levels of government and across the political spectrum Eighteen women, 16 of them Democrats, shared their stories. Here’s what they described. Black women are harassed differently than their white or male colleagues. M

More Black women are being elected to office. Few feel safe once they get there

Every day for more than four years, Kiah Morris lived in fear. She developed a safety routine for her family with the help of an international security expert, installed security cameras outside their home and received firearms training. When Morris took office as a Democratic state representative in Vermont in 2015, she was the first Black woman elected to the state’s legislature in 26 years. Her district was located in a county with an estimated population of 36,589 that was about 96 percent

21 lesbian bars remain in America. Owners share why they must be protected

Rachel and Sheila Smallman spent the summer of 2016 traveling the Gulf Coast, trying to find the best place to open a lesbian bar. There were queer bars along the coast, but they largely catered to cisgender gay men. The Smallmans visited at least five cities in four states. On one night, the Smallmans met a friend at a New Orleans gay bar. They were there for about three minutes before some of the patrons and employees started yelling at them to leave because they were women. The couple and t

After record 2020 election turnout, states look to limit voting options

State legislative sessions often see an uptick in the introduction of restrictive voting bills following an election year, but legislation that aims to limit who can vote, where, when and how has reached unprecedented levels this year. The Brennan Center, an independent nonpartisan law and policy organization in New York, found that more than 253 restrictive voting bills had been introduced in legislatures across 43 states just this year through Feb. 23 — up from 35 bills across 15 states in al

Arizona lawmakers renew push to criminalize abortions in latest challenge to Roe v. Wade

Abortion has been at the forefront of conservative politics since the 1973 Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade, in which the court ruled that the Constitution protects a woman’s liberty to choose to have an abortion without excessive government restriction. Now, with a 6-3 conservative majority in the nation’s highest court, reproductive rights advocates are worried that right will be chipped away as anti-abortion politicians push legal boundaries to challenge the decision. An Arizona bill pr

The data behind 9 big challenges facing Biden

President Joe Biden takes office with some important advantages — namely Democratic control of the House and Senate to help him push his administration’s agenda forward. But that doesn’t make the confluence of crises he faces any less daunting: a raging pandemic, economic upheaval, years lost in the effort to combat climate change, persisting racial inequities and the internal threat of domestic extremism. “The state of the nation today, [there’s] no time to waste … get to work immediately,” Bi

What is the 25th Amendment and what could it mean for Trump?

Following the siege of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday by a violent pro-Trump mob, a number of Democratic lawmakers, including soon-to-be Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and some Republicans have called for the president to be removed from office, either through impeachment or use of the 25th Amendment after they say he incited the violence perpetrated by his supporters on Jan. 6. The 25th Amendment has rarely been used since its ratification in 1967, following John F. Kennedy’s assa

Arizona mayors call for state mask mandate, communication from governor to slow COVID-19

Mayors of four major Arizona cities gathered to call for a statewide mask mandate and address the rise in COVID-19 cases and the risks holiday and snowbird travelers will bring. A statewide mask mandate, a 14-day quarantine for people coming from out-of-state and enforcement on bad actors violating COVID-19 guidelines are among the asks from Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego, Tucson Mayor Regina Romero, Flagstaff Mayor Coral Evans and Tolleson Mayor Anna Tovar. Gov. Doug Ducey recognized the science

Protesters' indictments on gang-related charges criticized by attorneys, advocates

Gang-related charges brought by a Maricopa County prosecutor against 15 people protesting police violence drew condemnation from attorneys and community advocates, who said the charges were far too harsh and could intimidate people from exercising their free-speech rights. The Maricopa County Attorney's Office suggested the charges to a grand jury, which returned the indictment last week. The protesters worked together so they couldn't get arrested and turned violent when officers apprehended

Women gather at Phoenix courthouse to protest Amy Coney Barrett's planned confirmation

About 20 women, most of whom are attorneys, dressed in red cloaks and white hoods, walked synchronized in silence in front of the Sandra Day O'Connor U.S. Courthouse in downtown Phoenix on Sunday to honor late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and to protest the plan to replace her with Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Christina Carter, an attorney who has represented many people arrested at protests against police violence this year, was one of the organizers for the event. The cloaks and hood
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