Shaving his way through three countries

José Antonio Perdemo is a Venezuelan refugee who was in Lima early March. He has cut hair in each country he's been in on his migration journey. He has since moved to Ecuador.

José Antonio Perdomo, the owner of Barbero Express, gives Paolo Rojas a shave in a public park in Lima, Peru. Perdomo walks the center of Lima with his portable barber stand from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
José Antonio Perdomo has lived in Ecuador, Colombia and Peru since leaving Venezuela. In each country, he has cut hair. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
The first night José Antonio Perdomo was in Lima, he was robbed while in a taxi. He worked hard to recuperate what he lost, but it wasn't easy. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
On a good day, José Antonio Perdomo serves up to six clients. On a bad day, that number can be zero. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
The generator José Antonio Perdomo uses to power his clippers is the most expensive piece of his equipment. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
José Antonio Perdomo patiently cuts Paolo Rojas' hair. The cut and a shave took an hour. "What you learn well, you never forget," Perdomo says. (Photo/ Chloe Jones Project)
Some of the tools of trade for José Antonio Perdomo, who owns Barbero Express in central Lima. (Photo by Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project )
José Antonio Perdomo's experience with migration has been difficult, he says. But he still holds on to the belief that "sometimes, things happen for a reason." (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
Soon after these photographs were taken, José Antonio Perdomo moved back to Quito, Ecuador. He's hoping to find a place where he can "feel good," and Lima wasn't that place. He's searching for help from an individual or government to get there, wherever "there" is. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands)

Venezuelans Seek Refuge in Lima

Over 700,000 Venezuelans have fled to Peru and an estimated 85% of those reside in Lima, according to the United Nations. Many arrive with no where to go and depend on refugee shelters while they seek something more stable. Here are photos I took on assignment for the Cronkite Borderlands Project at two shelters in Lima; Alburgue Sin Fronteras, or "Hostel Without Borders" and an UNHCR shelter. 

Restless and hungry, the children give each other hugs, pull hair and wait patiently for lunch to be served in the patio of Albergue sin Fronteras, a hostel in Lima that takes in Venezuelan refugees. (Photo by: Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
A young Venezuelan girl practices writing in Alburgue Sin Fronters, or Hostel Without Borders, a shelter for Venezuelan refugees in Lima, Peru. (Photo by Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
Jose Veloz Suarez and his wife Nieves Elena arrived with their son Javier heard about Alburgue Sin Fronteras, or Hostel Without Borders, at the border between Ecuador and Peru. (Photo by: Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
A young venezuelan girl and her brother who was born in Peru, at Alburgue Sin Fronteras, or Hostel Without Borders, a shelter for Venezuelan refugees in Lima, Peru. (Photo by Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
One of the rooms in Alburgue Sin Fronteras, or Hostel Without Borders, a shelter for Venezuelan refugees in Lima, Peru. (Photo by Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
Javier Salazar, 2, is one of the Venezuelan children living in Alburgue Sin Fronteras, or Hostel Without Borders, a shelter for Venezuelan refugees in Lima, Peru. (Photo by Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
Eleymar Betarvcourt, 3, is a Venezuelan living in Alburgue Sin Fronteras, or Hostel Without Borders, a shelter for Venezuelan refugees in Lima, Peru (Photo by: Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
A Venezualan man in Alburgue Sin Fronteras, or Hostel Without Borders, a shelter for Venezuelan refugees in Lima, Peru. (Photo by Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
A mother embraces her young son at an UNHCR shelter in Lima, Peru. This shelter allows Venezuelan refugees to stay for 15 days. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
Andreina Iyala ,15, and another young girl in an UNHCR shelter in Lima, Peru. Some experts say the smartphones can be a lifeline for migrants. (Photo by Chloe Jones/ Cronkite Borderlands Project)
Yenife Alexandra Carmona Rieracda, 23, and her 5-year-old daughter, Yoliannys, traveled two months to get to Lima. (Photo by Chloe Jones/Cronkite Borderlands Project)
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