A Different Border Crisis | Cronkite News, Arizona PBS

I was the project lead for this story. My duties included pitching the idea, directing the reporting, leading interviews, taking photos, designing the layout and organizing and writing the story.

This project won the 2019 David Teeuwan Student Journalism Award from the Online News Association, 2019 Best Student Investigative Reporting from the Arizona Press Club, 2019 Best Multimedia Feature Story from the Associated College Press and a 2019 Best Multimedia Use of Multimedia Finalist from the Society of Professional Journalists Region 11 Mark of Excellence Awards.

Sewage is the real border crisis for many border towns and cities

People who live in Imperial Beach, California, in Naco and Nogales in Arizona and in Texas communities along the Rio Grande all say the same thing: When it rains, it stinks. The reason is a failing, aging network of pipes and wastewater treatment plants that run from Mexico into each of these communities. When heavy rains fall, the pipes often break and spill raw sewage on both sides of the border, causing not only a putrid odor but public health and environmental concerns...
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Una crisis diferente en la frontera

En Imperial Beach, California, Naco y Nogales en Arizona y en comunidades a lo largo del río Grande en Texas — los residentes tienen un desafío en común: La lluvia ocasiona problemas. Y muchas veces, después de que llueve, apesta. La causa de esto es una red anticuada de tuberías y plantas de tratamiento de aguas residuales que conectan a comunidades de México con Estados Unidos. Cuando llueve, los sistemas de tubería para aguas residuales en México se saturan con agua pluvial. Las tuberías pueden fracturarse y derramar aguas negras de ambos lados de la frontera. Esto no solo ocasiona un olor pútrido sino también riesgos para el medio ambiente y la salud pública...

Sewage is the real border crisis for many border towns and cities

People who live in Imperial Beach, California, in Naco and Nogales in Arizona and in Texas communities along the Rio Grande all say the same thing: When it rains, it stinks. The reason is a failing, aging network of pipes and wastewater treatment plants that run from Mexico into each of these communities. When heavy rains fall, the pipes often break and spill raw sewage on both sides of the border, causing not only a putrid odor but public health and environmental concerns...

Nogales seeks a fair deal from binational commission on costs of treating wastewater

Nogales seeks a fair deal from binational commission on costs of treating wastewater NOGALES – More than 370 articles on the Nogales International online news archive contain the word “sewage,” and that archive only dates to 2001. These articles reveal a long history of broken pipes, sewage overflows, industrial waste and more. Sewage in Ambos Nogales – “ambos” is Spanish for “both,” referring to the twin cities in Arizona and Sonora – has been an issue since 1944, when the first binational tr

Sewage flowing into Nogales Wash raises concerns about water supply for both Mexico and U.S.

Sewage flowing into Nogales Wash raises concerns about water supply for both Mexico and U.S. NOGALES, Mexico – Wastewater containing raw sewage has been intermittently flowing into the Nogales Wash from Mexico since mid-January, spurring concerns about health and the water supply for communities on both sides of the border. Four of the five pumps at the Los Alisos Wastewater Treatment Plant in Nogales, Mexico, have been malfunctioning since mid-January, but a temporary fix is in the works. Je
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